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TOPIC: drawing lineup

drawing lineup 2 weeks 4 days ago #3113

Good Morning,

I have a question about drawing descaled high carbon wire thru two passes.

We are getting a heavy residual on the finish product that is going thru a plasma cleaning line to remove the lube. the process works but the problem we are having is the amount of residual entering the reactor is turning the electrolyte to syrup for a lack of a better word.. We are filtering it but its overwhelming those also.

The lube is 644N Blanchford lube that is heavy in borax. When the electrolyte turns to sludge it stops pumping thru the anodes and pretty much burns them up.

As of now we have tried 50 thousandths over with pressure dies to try and eliminate some residual but it hasn't really improved anything. We are using Paramount die holders and dies.

Could it be we are going the wrong way and need a really tight pressure die to help melt the lube? Would that cut down on all the dust being carried on the wire and instead having an even melted coating? We are using standard 10-12 degree dies also.

Thanking you in advance for your help
Last Edit: 2 weeks 2 days ago by Peter J Stewart-Hay.
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drawing lineup 2 weeks 14 hours ago #3114

Hello Richard,

Would you please advise us of the following:

- Inlet size
- Finish size
- Number of passes
- Die diameters
- Details of the descaler

Thank you.
Regards,
Peter J. Stewart-Hay Principal
Stewart-Hay Associates
www.Stewart-Hay.com
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drawing lineup 1 week 6 days ago #3115

It is a 9/32 1070 carbon. The firs die is a .239 and the second is a .206 with basically guide dies for pressure dies @.050 over.
Its a wire brush descaler running 450fpm..the lube is a heavy duty lube with alot of borax..is it better to go bigger with the pressure dies or tighter so the lube will melt to a film instead of the powder that come thru? We have tried tighter pressure dies but it builds so much pressure in the paramount die holder the nibs have to be beaten out.
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drawing lineup 1 week 4 days ago #3116

The Normal Ferrous Moderator is presently unable to Login to this thread. Here is his, (Eduardo's) response:

We do not understand the need to use a lubricant containing borax unless after the drawing processes the rod requires borax

The presence of borax can be part of the problem.

From the drawing point of view, you can use a normal sodium stearate lubricant from any of the wire drawing lubricant manufactures

Please your comments
Regards,
Peter J. Stewart-Hay Principal
Stewart-Hay Associates
www.Stewart-Hay.com
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Last Edit: 1 week 4 days ago by Peter J Stewart-Hay.
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drawing lineup 1 week 4 days ago #3118

It is a Sodium tetraborate lube. Any other lube tried scratches the dies. We have tried Graphite lube also and it was the same or worse. It is possible the descaling with wire brushes isn't getting it clean and the borax lube is all that will draw semi clean rod I guess? We have tried several calcium lubes also but the die life is short. Are the big pressure dies a no factor in the amount of residual?

Thank you for helping
Last Edit: 1 week 3 days ago by Peter J Stewart-Hay.
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drawing lineup 1 week 3 days ago #3119

Can you tell me what you mean by "the borax could be the problem" please and thank you..
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