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Peter J Stewart-Hay

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Peter J Stewart-Hay

14
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About Me

Personal Information

Gender
Male
About me
A university trained Professional Mechanical Engineer, registered in the Province of Ontario, Canada.

A wire and cable manufacturing engineering specialist with over 35 years hands on experience.

Company Information

Company
Stewart-Hay Associates
Address
Unit 51, 1814 Shore Road
London, Ontario Canada
N6K 0C6
City / Town
London
State
Ontario
Country
Canada
Land phone
519 6413212
Website
http://www.Stewart-Hay.com

Background

College / University
U of M
Graduation Year
1968
Degree/Certifications
B Sc. M.E.
Skills and Expertise
A university trained Professional Mechanical Engineer, registered in the Province of Ontario, Canada.

A wire and cable manufacturing engineering specialist with over 35 years hands on experience.

Recent activities

  • Peter J Stewart-Hay replied to the topic 'Re: Copper discoloration' in the forum.
    Hello again Zamuir,

    When I discussed the temperature of the wire entering the annealing leg of the annealer, I was referring to the preheating leg or legs of the annealer itself. The temperature wire as it exits the drawing machine is not the issue.
    Read More...
    kunena.post 1 day ago
  • kunena.thankyou 4 days ago
  • Peter J Stewart-Hay replied to the topic 'reduction angle and bearing length' in the forum.
    Hello again Mr. Ajalloueian,

    The reduction angle for copper drawing dies is an interesting subject. North American wire manufacturers usually specify reduction angles of 16 to 20 degree whereas European wire manufacturers typically specify reduction angles of 18 to 22 degrees.

    Generally speaking, the length of the bearing in the die determines the final size of the wire but of course, it is not that easy as there are other issues involved.

    It is reasonably clear to us that you have a limited technical library at your company. thus we suggest the following;

    1) Purchase the Nonferrous Wire Handbook, Vol. 3 at
    portal.wirenet.org/eweb/DynamicPage.aspx...55dd79&WIRENETToken=

    2) See if your wire die supplier has a technical pamphlet or book on drawing dies including how to maintain them. Generally speaking, these are free for their customers.

    3) Drawing lubricants are also fundamental to the drawing process including Babcock measurement and control. See if your lubricant supplier has technical literature on their products. Again, free for their customers.

    Optimized die geometry is best done by process experimentation over long periods of time.
    Read More...
    kunena.post 5 days ago
  • Peter J Stewart-Hay replied to the topic 'Re: Copper discoloration' in the forum.
    Hello again,

    I have looked at a photo of a SAMP RC-80 Annealer and apart from the layout of the machine, the process issues are still the same.

    I) The wire is too hot entering the annealing leg or;
    II) The steam supply is for some reason now inadequate at the steam tube keep oxygen completely away from the entering wire, hence the mild amount of discoloration or;
    III) Your annealing solution is too contaminated and must be replaced.

    Anyway, that is all we can do from here. You must sleuth out the process issue. Let us know when you have solved the problem.
    Read More...
    kunena.post 5 days ago
  • Peter J Stewart-Hay replied to the topic 'Re: Copper discoloration' in the forum.
    Hello Zamuir,

    I find it very difficult to answer your questions without the model number of the drawing machine and the annealer from Winget-Syncro. Winget Syncro is English so I have to relate to Syncro annealers in the US and Canada. I will take a guess however and ask the following questions.

    1) I presume that this is a standard two level annealer and that there are two preheat tubes, one angular and one horizontal followed by one vertical steam annealing tube followed by an angular cooling tube and then air wipes.

    2) I presume that the drawing machine is not running over speed and is according to the chart at www.babcockwire.co.uk/technical_library_..._machinery_range.pdf

    3) The three-phase current to the various tubes is controlled by voltage taps on the power transformers so that more or less power can be delivered to the various tubes at the annealer.

    4) The steam in the annealing chamber is saturated so that the temperature and pressure are fixed.

    5) Perhaps the cooling water balances the steam pressure in the small water tank.

    6) The annealer perhaps is as per the drawing and specification at www.babcockwire.co.uk/technical_library_...type_df_annealer.pdf Please confirm!

    Now, your statement: "the rod breakdown machine is producing dark copper wires directly after it enters the annealer." is a bit strange for me because it suggests that the wire was already too hot before it entered the annealing tube. An alternative would be that the steam outlet at the wire inlet on the annealer tube is plugged or partially plugged.

    That is where we must start with this problem.
    Read More...
    kunena.post 6 days ago
  • Peter J Stewart-Hay replied to the topic 'Micro planetary strander' in the forum.
    Hello Thomas,

    I have seen a few of these machines and all were professionally manufactured (machine shops) locally by the cable companies themselves.

    They consist of a single steel plate with the bobbins equally spaced on it in a planetary configuration. Braking is by small disk brakes, manually adjusted.

    These stranding machines rotate very fast so they are kept in really excellent condition and generally run without an operator.

    A wire break counter near the closing die will stop the machine if a wire breaks.
    Read More...
    kunena.post 7 days ago
  • Peter J Stewart-Hay replied to the topic 'For Sector Shaped conductor' in the forum.
    "A segmental conductor is a round, stranded conductor composed of three, four, five or six sectors slightly insulated from one another. This construction has the advantage of lower AC resistance due to increased surface area and skin effect." (Anixter)
    Read More...
    kunena.post 16 days ago